Tag Archives: patterndesign

Malabrigo Knitting Pattern Release: Bryce Canyon Cowl

I hinted last winter I was up to something with one of my favorite yarn companies.  I’m happy to announce today that I’m designing some knitting patterns for Malabrigo Yarns.  My first design for them was just released, a cowl called the Bryce Canyon Cowl. It features a fun texture created by slipping stitches up multiple rows.  The cowl uses one 100 gram skein of fingering weight yarn such as Malabrigo Sock or Malabrigo Mechita.  This was my first time working with Mechita (a single spun yarn) and it was a true delight.

Bryce Canyon Cowl

The pattern is offered for sale by Malabrigo on Ravelry.  You can read more and buy the pattern here

The Bryce Canyon cowl is knit in the round and uses one skein of sock yarn, perfect for that single skein you can’t decide how to use. You can wear your cowl as a single looped long scarf, double looped as a casual mid-chest cowl or triple looped for a snugly neck warmer. The slipped stitch texture plays well with highly variegated yarns as it shows off the color changes.

Bryce Canyon Cowl

Yarn

    • Approximately 375-400 yards/343-366 meters fingering weight yarn. Sample shown in Malabrigo Sock  (100% merino, 440 yards/402 meters, 3.53oz/100g) in the coloway Diana.
  • Needles
    • Size US 4 (3.5mm) circular needle in a length of 24″/60 cm or 32″/81 cm, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Other Materials
    • 1 stitch marker (additional stitch markers to notate repeats optional)
    • Tapestry needle
    • Blocking pins

Malabrigo sample knit using Malabrigo Mechita in the Aniversario colorway. Photo Credit: Malabrigo Yarns

  • Finished Measurements
    • After Blocking
      • 58″/147 cm circumference
      • 7″/18 cm height
  • Gauge (all over 4”/10cm)
    • After Blocking:
      • Pattern: 20-22 stitches & 60 rounds

The cowl is blocked aggressively width-wise. Meeting exact gauge is not crucial but may affect the final dimensions. Stockinette gauge is provided to assist with determining an appropriate needle size for you.

 

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2017 Goals

Yarn Crawl Shop - Sheep Street

I spent some time in December thinking about my goals from last year and my goals for this year.  I felt last year like my time for fiber arts was being ruled by my goals.  Finish x many designs, knit x many yards, and so on.  In some ways, it sucked the fun out of it.  I think it was a combination of too many goals and being too optimistic.  So this year I’ve dialed back and instead of focusing on quantity, I’m focusing on learning new things.  That sounds way more fun, right?

A couple notes about the blog – I’ll be staying with the blog posts every other week, with a focus on them being shorter.  They’ll also be published on Sunday going forward.

Review of last year:

I knit 3,500 yards across nine projects.  Six of those were my own designs, with one not yet released.  Four were shawls, two were cowls.  I finished one spinning project but have several more on the wheels and bobbins.  I released five new patterns, the most recent being the Sybil Ludington shawl, which may be my favorite. I taught two new classes (Lace Knitting 101 & Bead Knitting) plus one old one (raw fleeces) at two different fiber events.

About setting goals:

I posted year before last about setting SMART goals, particularly as they rely to fiber artists.  That post is here.  SMART goals are specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time relevant. While I think its a valid method, its not what I used this year.

2017 goals:

FloofyMoose Fibers

  1. Write and submit one article
  2. Develop and teach two new classes
  3. Design and publish two new patterns

Knitting

  1. Learn how to knit entrelac
  2. Learn how to knit brioche

Spinning

  1. Learn to spin with beads
  2. Spin a consistent worsted weight yarn

2014-02-14 022

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Knitting Pattern Release: Sybil Ludington Shawl

I’m pleased to announce that I just released my a cozy new shawl for fall, The Sybil Ludington Shawl!  It features a crescent shape with long wings, perfect to wrap around you., and uses just under two 100 gram skeins of fingering weight yarn.  Each row of the shawl is worked across different sections: mesh, a cable panel, lace, another cable panel and then mesh again.   I’m sure you’ll enjoy curling up to knit, and wear, this shawl.

01a Back

You can buy it and read more about it on Ravelry (you don’t have to be a member!).  Click here!

03a open

The stitch patterns for the cable and the lace are provided in a chart, as well as written out, and percentages of yarn used are also provided if you wish to modify the size of your shawl.  The pattern has been test knitted and tech edited.

Who is Sybil Ludington? While Paul Revere is most commonly credited with riding to alert militia of approaching British forces, so did the young Sybil Ludington.  Her father headed the local militia during the American Revolution.  On April 26, 1777, at the age of 16, she left on a forty mile ride to warn her father’s militiamen that British troops were planning to attack Danbury, Connecticut.  Her ride lasted from 9 p.m. to dawn the next morning and one of her stops was to warn the people of Danbury.  While the British troops destroyed several buildings and homes in Danbury, there were few people killed, due in large part to Sybil’s warning.

02a Detail

  • Yarn
    • Approximately 720 yards fingering weight yarn. Shown in Zen Yarn Garden Serenity 20 (70% superwash merino, 20% cashmere and 10% nylon, 400 yards, 3.53oz) in the colorway Black Cherry.   Other suggested yarns include Cascade Heritage Silk, Dream in Color Smooshy, or Plucky Primo Fingering.
  • Needle
    • Size US 4 (3.5mm) circular needle in a length of 32″/81 cm, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Other Materials
    • 4 stitch markers
    •  Tapestry needle
    •  Cable needle
    •  Blocking pins
    •  Optional: additional stitch markers for marking lace repeats

01b Arm

  • Finished Measurements
    • After Blocking
      • 35.5″ wide
      • 38.5″ height (or depth)

The shawl is blocked aggressively width-wise. Meeting exact gauge is not crucial but may affect the final dimensions. 

04a front

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Knitting Pattern Release: Landsford Canal Cowl

I’m pleased to announce I just released a new cowl pattern!  It uses one 100 gram skein of fingering weight yarn and is called Landsford Canal Cowl.  It features a lacey V pattern, cables and beads. Cables, lace and beads, OH MY!

Hanging

You can buy it and read more about it on Ravelry (you don’t have to be a member!).  Click here!

Bench

The Landsford Canal Cowl is knit in the round with a repeating cable and lace pattern and beads.  It uses one skein of sock yarn, perfect for that single skein you can’t decide how to use.  You can wear your cowl double looped as a casual mid-chest cowl or triple looped for a snugly neck warmer. The stitch pattern is provided in a chart, as well as written out, and percentages of yarn used are also provided if you wish to modify the size of your cowl. Also included is a checklist version of the pattern.  Detailed instructions are included for adding the beads, making this a great pattern if you’re new to knitting with beads.  The pattern has been test knitted and tech edited.

Model

  • Yarn
    • Approximately 420 yards fingering weight yarn. Shown in One Twisted Tree Prime (75% superwash merino & 25% nylon, 460 yards, 3.53oz/ 100g) in the colorway Miss Fisher’s Pearl Handled Pistol.  Other suggested yarns include Cascade Heritage, Dream in Color Smooshy, Knit Picks Stroll or Madelinetosh Twist Light.  You can visit and buy One Twisted Tree yarn here.
  • Needle
    • Size US 5 (3.5mm) circular needle in a length of 24″/60 cm or 32″/81 cm, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Other Materials
    • Crochet hook – Size US 13 (0.90mm)
    • 15 grams or 224 size 6/0 seed beads
    • At least 1 stitch marker
    • Cable needed
    • Tapestry needle
    • Blocking pins
  • Finished Measurements
    • After Blocking
      • 70″ circumference
      • 7.5″ height
  • Gauge (all over 4”/10cm)
    • After Blocking:
      • Pattern: 16 stitches & 36 rounds

Closeup

The cowl is blocked aggressively width-wise. Meeting exact gauge is not crucial but may affect the final dimensions. Stockinette gauge is provided to assist with determining an appropriate needle size for you.

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Knitting Pattern Release: Elizabeth Blackwell Stole

I’m pleased to announce that I just released my new beaded stole for summer!  It uses 100 grams of lace weight yarn and is called the Elizabeth Blackwell Stole.  It features a rectangular shape and a geometric lace design with beads.

Side view

You can buy it and read more about it on Ravelry (you don’t have to be a member!).  Click here!

Close Up

The Elizabeth Blackwell Shawl is a rectangular shawl (frequently called a stole) knit flat with a repeating lace pattern and beads. It uses 100 grams of lace yarn, creating a lightweight airy fabric perfect for summer nights. The stitch pattern is provided in a chart, as well as written out, and percentages of yarn used are also provided if you wish to modify the size of your shawl. Also included is a checklist version of the pattern that allows you to step line-by-line through the pattern, checking off rows as they are completed. The pattern has been test knitted and tech edited.

Elizabeth Blackwell was the first woman to receive a medical degree in the United States.  Her impetus for pursing medicine was a friend who suffered from a terminal disease that wished for a female physician.  Blackwell later opened clinics and infirmaries for treating women and children and created a medical school for women.

Back

  • Yarn
    • Approximately 800 yards/ 732 meters lace weight yarn. Shown in Malabrigo Silkpaca (70% alpaca/ 30% silk, 420 yards/384 meters, 50g) in the colorway Solis.  Other suggested yarns include Malabrigo Lace, Alpaca with a Twist Fino, Classic Elite Yarns Silky Alpaca Lace, Knit Picks Alpaca Cloud, or Cascade Yarns Alpaca Lace.
  • Needle
    • Size US 4 (3.5 mm), or size needed to obtain gauge, circular needle in a length of 24″/60 cm or longer.
  • Other Materials
    • Crochet hook – Size US 10 (0.75 mm)
    • 10 grams or 328 size 8/0 beads
    • 5 stitch markers
    • Tapestry needle
    • Blocking pins

Hanging off Bench

  • Finished Measurements
    • After Blocking
      • 57″/145 cm width
      • 22″/56 cm height

The stole is blocked aggressively. Meeting exact gauge is not crucial but may affect the final dimensions. Gauge is provided to assist with determining an appropriate needle size for you.

Wide Open

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Knitting Pattern Release: Grace Fryer Shawl

I’m pleased to announce that I just released my new shawl!  It uses one 100 gram skein of fingering weight yarn and is called the Grace Fryer Shawl.  It features a semi-circle shape and different lace patterns in between increase rows.  What I’m most pleased about is the size of it given it only uses one skein of fingering weight yarn.

014

You can buy it and read more about it on Ravelry (you don’t have to be a member!).  Click here!

019

The Grace Fryer Shawl is a semi-circular shawl knit flat with sections of repeating lace patterns.  It uses one skein of sock (fingering weight) yarn, perfect for that single skein you can’t decide how to use.  The stitch patterns are provided in a chart, as well as written out, and percentages of yarn used are also provided if you wish to modify the size of your shawl.  I designed this pattern for my Lace Knitting 101 Class so its well suited to beginning lace knitters.  The pattern has been test knitted and tech edited.

Who is Grace Fryer? Grace Fryer, along with other “Radium Girls,” worked for U.S. Radium applying radium-laced paint to watch dials in the early 20th century.  At that time radium was widely believed to have health benefits and U.S. Radium encouraged the Radium Girls to use their lips and tongues to keep their paint brushes fine tipped.  Grace was the first of the Radium Girls to bring suit against U.S. Radium after incurring strange medical symptoms and ultimately the legal action paved the way for improvements in industrial and employee safety.

036

  • Yarn
    • Approximately 370-400 yards/340-365 meters fingering weight yarn. Shown in Copper Centaur Sutdio Centaur Sock (80% superwash merino and 20% nylon, 400 yards/365 meters, 3.53oz/100g) in the colorway Caribbean Sea.   Other suggested yarns include Cascade Heritage Silk, Dream in Color Smooshy, Madelintosh Sock, or Plucky Primo Fingering.
  • Needle
    • Size US 6 (3.5mm) circular needle in a length of 24″/60 cm or 32″/81 cm, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Other Materials
    • At least 2 stitch markers (you may want more to mark pattern repeats)
    • Tapestry needle
    • Blocking pins

017

  • Finished Measurements
    • After Blocking
      • 39.5″/100 cm wide
      • 21.5″/55 cm height (or depth)

The cowl is blocked aggressively width-wise. Meeting exact gauge is not crucial but may affect the final dimensions. Stockinette gauge is provided to assist with determining an appropriate needle size for you.

022

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2016 Goals

Fiber arts wise last year was interesting.  Things were different than I expect and new opportunities presented themselves.  I can only hope 2016 is just as exciting!

Yarn Crawl Shop - Sheep Street

Review of last year’s goals:

I won’t go through each 2015 goal but I do want to talk about what I learned from my goals.  I set a knitting goal to improve knitting efficiency but once I researched different techniques, I wasn’t as interested.  I might some day in the future, but not now.  Next, rather than stating a number of projects to knit, a better measure would be based on number of yards knit.  I set a goal to design and publish four patterns and fell short

Rather than review each 2015 goal individually I want to talk about what I learned from my goals.  For one, sometimes interests change, and one shouldn’t feel required to fulfill a goal just for the sake of meeting a goal. Second, sometimes a new opportunity presents itself and that might require the sacrifice of time that might otherwise be dedicated toward a specific goal.  And you know what? That’s ok.  Third, and last, don’t set too many goals! Focus on what’s most important to you.

About setting goals:

I posted last year about setting SMART goals, particularly as they rely to fiber artists.  That post is here.  SMART goals are specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time relevant.

2016 goals:

FloofyMoose Fibers

  1. Organize fiber arts studio to allow for storage space
  2. Design & release six patterns
  3. Propose three articles
  4. Develop two new classes

Knitting

  1. Knit 5000 yards of yarn
  2. Complete one brioche project

Spinning & Fiber Prep

  1. Clean remaining fleeces (1 merino and 1 alpaca) by March 31, 2016.
  2. Process 144 ounces of raw fleece (including cleaning).
  3. Spin 48 ounces of fiber.
  4. Spin two ounces with beads

2014-02-14 022

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Knitting Pattern Release: Florence Cathedral Cowl

I’m pleased to announce that I just released my second for sale knitting pattern!  It uses one 100 gram skein of fingering weight yarn and is called Florence Cathedral Cowl.  It features an arched lace pattern with beads added to the knitting.

C

You can buy it and read more about it on Ravelry (you don’t have to be a member!).  Click here!

EThe Florence Cathedral cowl is knit in the round and uses one skein of sock yarn, perfect for that single skein you can’t decide how to use. The addition of beads (two per repeat) gives the call a bit of sparkle.  You can wear your cowl as a single looped long scarf, double looped as a casual mid-chest cowl or triple looped for a snugly neck warmer. The stitch pattern is provided in a chart, as well as written out. Percentages of yarn used are also provided if you wish to modify the size of your cowl.  Detailed instructions are included for adding the beads, making this a great pattern if you’re new to knitting with beads.  The pattern has been test knitted and tech edited.

D

  • Yarn
    • Approximately 400-440 yards/366-402 meters fingering weight yarn. Shown in Malabrigo Sock (100% merino, 440 yards/402 meters, 3.53oz/100g) in the coloway Tiziano Red.   Other suggested yarns include Cascade Heritage Silk, Dream in Color Smooshy, Madelintosh Sock, or Plucky Primo Fingering.
  • Needle
    • Size US 6 (3.5mm) circular needle in a length of 24″/60 cm or 32″/81 cm, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Other Materials
    • Crochet hook – Size US 12 (1.00mm)
    • 25 grams or 210 size 6/9 seed beads
    • 1 stitch marker
    • Tapestry needle
    • Blocking pins

B

  • Finished Measurements
    • After Blocking
      • 66″/168 cm circumference
      • 8″/20 cm height
  • Gauge (all over 4”/10cm)
    • After Blocking:
      • Ribbing: 17 stitches
      • Pattern: 16 stitches & 30 rounds

The cowl is blocked aggressively width-wise. Meeting exact gauge is not crucial but may affect the final dimensions. Stockinette gauge is provided to assist with determining an appropriate needle size for you.

A

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Knitting Pattern Release: Cinque Terre Cowl

I’m pleased to announce that I just released my first for sale knitting pattern!  It uses one 100 gram skein of fingering weight yarn and is called Cinque Terre Cowl.  It features a sophisticated texture made by passing slipped stitches over knit stitches.

TextureYou can buy it and read more about it on Ravelry (you don’t have to be a member!).  Click here!

Two wrap layeredThe Cinque Terre cowl is knit in the round and uses one skein of sock yarn, perfect for that single skein you can’t decide how to use. You can wear your cowl as a single looped long scarf, double looped as a casual mid-chest cowl or triple looped for a snugly neck warmer. The stitch pattern is provided in a chart, as well as written out. Percentages of yarn used are also provided if you wish to modify the size of your cowl.

One Wrap

  • Yarn
    • Approximately 380-410 yards/347-375 meters fingering weight yarn. Shown in Malabrigo Sock (100% merino, 440 yards/402 meters, 3.53oz/100g) in the coloway Aguas.   Other suggested yarns include Cascade Heritage Silk, Dream in Color Smooshy, Madelintosh Sock, or Plucky Primo Fingering.
  • Needles
    • Size US 4 (3.5mm) circular needle in a length of 24″/60 cm or 32″/81 cm, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Other Materials
    • 1 stitch marker
    • Tapestry needle
    • Blocking pins

Drape

  • Finished Measurements
    • After Blocking
      • 60″/152 cm circumference
      • 7″/18 cm height
  • Gauge (all over 4”/10cm)
    • Before Blocking:
      • Stockinette: 28 stitches & 38 rounds
      • Ribbing: 32 stitches
      • Pattern: 25 stitches & 40 rounds
    • After Blocking:
      • Ribbing: 22 stitches
      • Pattern: 20 stitches & 48 rounds

The cowl is blocked aggressively width-wise. Meeting exact gauge is not crucial but may affect the final dimensions. Stockinette gauge is provided to assist with determining an appropriate needle size for you.

Three Wraps

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2015 Goals

Well its time for those goals I mentioned.  Nothing like blogging them to hold myself accountable.  Yikes!

Yarn Crawl Shop - Sheep Street

Knitting

  1. Improve knitting efficiency, as measured by stitches per minute, by 50%.  Research lever knitting and Miriam Teagle.
  2. Knit one sweater and one shrug.
  3. Finish twelve projects, approximately one per month.
  4. Design and publish four patterns.

Spinning

  1. Spinning six ounces per month (or 72 ounces for the year) from stash.
  2. Spin two ounces with beads.
  3. Spin four ounces long-draw.
  4. Consistently spin eight ounces of worsted-weight.

Fiber Arts

  1. Finish flicking Alice fleece by end of March.
  2. Clean two current alpaca fleeces and any new by the end of October.
  3. Test process suri alpaca (carding).
  4. Finish combing Buster fleece.

2014-02-14 022

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