Tag Archives: texture

Malabrigo Knitting Pattern Release: Bryce Canyon Cowl

I hinted last winter I was up to something with one of my favorite yarn companies.  I’m happy to announce today that I’m designing some knitting patterns for Malabrigo Yarns.  My first design for them was just released, a cowl called the Bryce Canyon Cowl. It features a fun texture created by slipping stitches up multiple rows.  The cowl uses one 100 gram skein of fingering weight yarn such as Malabrigo Sock or Malabrigo Mechita.  This was my first time working with Mechita (a single spun yarn) and it was a true delight.

Bryce Canyon Cowl

The pattern is offered for sale by Malabrigo on Ravelry.  You can read more and buy the pattern here

The Bryce Canyon cowl is knit in the round and uses one skein of sock yarn, perfect for that single skein you can’t decide how to use. You can wear your cowl as a single looped long scarf, double looped as a casual mid-chest cowl or triple looped for a snugly neck warmer. The slipped stitch texture plays well with highly variegated yarns as it shows off the color changes.

Bryce Canyon Cowl

Yarn

    • Approximately 375-400 yards/343-366 meters fingering weight yarn. Sample shown in Malabrigo Sock  (100% merino, 440 yards/402 meters, 3.53oz/100g) in the coloway Diana.
  • Needles
    • Size US 4 (3.5mm) circular needle in a length of 24″/60 cm or 32″/81 cm, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Other Materials
    • 1 stitch marker (additional stitch markers to notate repeats optional)
    • Tapestry needle
    • Blocking pins

Malabrigo sample knit using Malabrigo Mechita in the Aniversario colorway. Photo Credit: Malabrigo Yarns

  • Finished Measurements
    • After Blocking
      • 58″/147 cm circumference
      • 7″/18 cm height
  • Gauge (all over 4”/10cm)
    • After Blocking:
      • Pattern: 20-22 stitches & 60 rounds

The cowl is blocked aggressively width-wise. Meeting exact gauge is not crucial but may affect the final dimensions. Stockinette gauge is provided to assist with determining an appropriate needle size for you.

 

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Knitting, Knitwear Design

Finished Object – Gridelin Shawl

c

Gift knitting.  Of course, now I want one for me too.  I’ve actually had this done for about a week but wanted to wait until I gave it to the recipient to post (although I don’t think she reads my blog).  Her birthday was an extra special occasion this year for two reasons – one, it was a milestone birthday, two, I actually got to see her on her birthday!  She’s one of the most knit-worthy people I know which means I enjoy knitting for her.  I gave it to her last night and I think she liked it.  Enough about the backstory and onto the good details! I won’t be going into great detail about the pattern as I plan to write a review next week about the book the pattern was in.

b

My Rav project page is here.

e

Pattern – Gridelin (Ravelry pattern here) from the Curls book by Hunter Hammersen.  Curls are unusual shaped shawls that I can best describe as half a crescent shawl.  It’s an eight row repeat that uses increases more similar to a triangular shawl.  Like I mentioned, I’ll discuss the book and yarn usage next week in my review.

d

Yarn –  Dream in Color Smooshy with Cashmere.  Smooshy with Cashmere is a fingering weight blend of 70% merino, 20% cashmere  and 10% nylon. One skein is 4 ounces and 400 yards.  Super squishy  and soft but not very tightly plied.  The colorway for this is Amber Glass, a rich gold color.  I held the yarn double (so it was about DK weight)  and used 784 yards.  I’ve used this yarn before and would use it again just because it is so soft. I was worried that by holding the yarn double I would have issues with splitty-ness but it was fine.

a

4 Comments

Filed under I Finished!, Knitting

Knitting Pattern Release: Florence Cathedral Cowl

I’m pleased to announce that I just released my second for sale knitting pattern!  It uses one 100 gram skein of fingering weight yarn and is called Florence Cathedral Cowl.  It features an arched lace pattern with beads added to the knitting.

C

You can buy it and read more about it on Ravelry (you don’t have to be a member!).  Click here!

EThe Florence Cathedral cowl is knit in the round and uses one skein of sock yarn, perfect for that single skein you can’t decide how to use. The addition of beads (two per repeat) gives the call a bit of sparkle.  You can wear your cowl as a single looped long scarf, double looped as a casual mid-chest cowl or triple looped for a snugly neck warmer. The stitch pattern is provided in a chart, as well as written out. Percentages of yarn used are also provided if you wish to modify the size of your cowl.  Detailed instructions are included for adding the beads, making this a great pattern if you’re new to knitting with beads.  The pattern has been test knitted and tech edited.

D

  • Yarn
    • Approximately 400-440 yards/366-402 meters fingering weight yarn. Shown in Malabrigo Sock (100% merino, 440 yards/402 meters, 3.53oz/100g) in the coloway Tiziano Red.   Other suggested yarns include Cascade Heritage Silk, Dream in Color Smooshy, Madelintosh Sock, or Plucky Primo Fingering.
  • Needle
    • Size US 6 (3.5mm) circular needle in a length of 24″/60 cm or 32″/81 cm, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Other Materials
    • Crochet hook – Size US 12 (1.00mm)
    • 25 grams or 210 size 6/9 seed beads
    • 1 stitch marker
    • Tapestry needle
    • Blocking pins

B

  • Finished Measurements
    • After Blocking
      • 66″/168 cm circumference
      • 8″/20 cm height
  • Gauge (all over 4”/10cm)
    • After Blocking:
      • Ribbing: 17 stitches
      • Pattern: 16 stitches & 30 rounds

The cowl is blocked aggressively width-wise. Meeting exact gauge is not crucial but may affect the final dimensions. Stockinette gauge is provided to assist with determining an appropriate needle size for you.

A

5 Comments

Filed under Knitting, Knitwear Design

Knitting Pattern Release: Cinque Terre Cowl

I’m pleased to announce that I just released my first for sale knitting pattern!  It uses one 100 gram skein of fingering weight yarn and is called Cinque Terre Cowl.  It features a sophisticated texture made by passing slipped stitches over knit stitches.

TextureYou can buy it and read more about it on Ravelry (you don’t have to be a member!).  Click here!

Two wrap layeredThe Cinque Terre cowl is knit in the round and uses one skein of sock yarn, perfect for that single skein you can’t decide how to use. You can wear your cowl as a single looped long scarf, double looped as a casual mid-chest cowl or triple looped for a snugly neck warmer. The stitch pattern is provided in a chart, as well as written out. Percentages of yarn used are also provided if you wish to modify the size of your cowl.

One Wrap

  • Yarn
    • Approximately 380-410 yards/347-375 meters fingering weight yarn. Shown in Malabrigo Sock (100% merino, 440 yards/402 meters, 3.53oz/100g) in the coloway Aguas.   Other suggested yarns include Cascade Heritage Silk, Dream in Color Smooshy, Madelintosh Sock, or Plucky Primo Fingering.
  • Needles
    • Size US 4 (3.5mm) circular needle in a length of 24″/60 cm or 32″/81 cm, or size needed to obtain gauge.
  • Other Materials
    • 1 stitch marker
    • Tapestry needle
    • Blocking pins

Drape

  • Finished Measurements
    • After Blocking
      • 60″/152 cm circumference
      • 7″/18 cm height
  • Gauge (all over 4”/10cm)
    • Before Blocking:
      • Stockinette: 28 stitches & 38 rounds
      • Ribbing: 32 stitches
      • Pattern: 25 stitches & 40 rounds
    • After Blocking:
      • Ribbing: 22 stitches
      • Pattern: 20 stitches & 48 rounds

The cowl is blocked aggressively width-wise. Meeting exact gauge is not crucial but may affect the final dimensions. Stockinette gauge is provided to assist with determining an appropriate needle size for you.

Three Wraps

Leave a comment

Filed under Knitting, Knitwear Design

Playing with the Drum Carder Pt 2

12356977114_abfae2661c_b

I talked a couple posts ago about playing on my friend Patty’s Fancy Kitty drum carder. The good news is by the time I got to the second sample it went better.  I enjoy preparing fiber in general and playing just for the sake of playing is especially fun.  As a recap, the drum carder is a Fancy Kitty with a fine or extra fine cloth, I think.

This sample came like the picture below.  Four separate colors in four separate fibers.  The blue is silk noil, the orange faux cashmere, the pink sparkle/angelina/firestar and the BFL purple.  It’s from Spin Culture on Etsy.  Here they are before their trip through the carder.  I did pull and tease them apart a bit first.

Spin Fusion Brights

I tried briefly to feed in the fibers normally but as expected the silk got stuck on the licker in (the little drum).  Based on my experience with the prior locks (see part 1) I applied the fiber, silk noil and the other fibers, directly to the big drum.  I also only applied it to half of the drum (width wise).

SF Drum

After removing the fiber from the drum, I ran it through one more time. The end result was a fluffy, textured batt.  I was happy with how the colors and fibers blended in the end (the picture at the top).

Have you ever tried drum carding? What would you card if you had a carder?

Leave a comment

Filed under Fiber Prep & Dyeing